ENTERart

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But is this art?” In front of a work of contemporary art most of us tend to feel awkward, reluctant, distant. The more an artist attempts to reach out to us and to make his art a part of our life, the more we wish to step back, thinking, maybe, that this is not “art” or that we haven’t got the means to understand, judge or enjoy a certain “contemporary” kind of artworks. Can we “appropriate” contemporary art? And do we have valuable reasons to do so?

από το εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του Guy Debord, «Κοινωνία του Θεάματος».

ENTERart workshops (1. and 2.) are responding to this kind of questioning with the help of anthropology in order to take into consideration the needs and experiences of the workshop’s participants Our aim is not to educate pliant viewers of contemporary visual arts or to simply inform on past and recent developments in art and anthropology. We also do not wish to contribute to the “memorization” of current political theorization that tends to prevail in contemporary artistic – and anthropological- discourse. On the contrary, we seek to provoke or revive critical controversies concerning these and many other stereotypical conceptions and practices inside but also beyond the “art world”.

ENTERart is addressed to those who are veritably interested to experiment with interventions in their everyday life made with “tools” inspired by contemporary art (in general, not only visual arts) and humanities. The participants make these “tools” by themselves according to their needs, independently of the knowledge they may already have in these fields. The workshop’s meetings may include speeches given by the coordinator and guests, but it is the participants’ active interest in the projects they propose (in groups or on their own) and in the whole process of searching for evidence and arguments that remains at the core of the work we do together. The projects are completed by the end of each circle (February and May) in close collaboration with the coordinator.

 

ENTERart’s workshops are one of TWIXTLab’s central activities, where new practices and theories are tested and all other workshops or project activities become interconnected.

Therefore, we invite artists and social scientists along with people interested in totally different subjects, students, employees or unemployed, younger or older people, those who seek a pleasant way-out or solutions to their problems, some who already participate in certain TWIXTLab’s activities and others that are just getting to know us, to meet and set the workshop’s “agenta” together, on the basis of the program we propose as follows:

PROGRAM

(2nd trimester: March-April-Mai 2016)

ENTERart 1.b/ ArtCult: “Histories” of art.

Elpida Rikou

Ιn collaboration with

Description

Histories of art provoke thoughts concerning current issues of anthropology of art and material culture, cultural heritage and politics, exhibition curating and museum collections. We shall discuss, more particularly, if our familiarity with images of violence helps us approach artworks from the past in a different perspective∙ how are “curiosities” inscribed in more familiar systems of object organizing and classification how we can extract and classify the information given decorative or useful objects,etc.

Suggested participantscollective project

An inventory of “exhibits” we have at home may inspire the invention of a contemporary cabinet of curiosities.

Tuesday 18:30-20:30.

Dates:

March 1st , March 15th , March 19th , April 12th , Mai 10th, Mai 24th

Program:

  • March 1st :

Elpida Rikou. “History or histories of art?”

From colonization to globalization, from renaissance cabinets of curiosities to contemporary museums, from “tribal” art to blockbuster exhibitions of the 21st century, histories of art raise issues concerning anthropology of art and material culture, cultural heritage and cultural politics, the role of the museums and that of curators and many other questions concerning, one way or another, our everyday life.

  • March 15th :

Κyveli Lignou-Tsamantani: «‘Histories’ of violence and atrocity in art: An overview». Part 1.

By taking as point of departure the notions of violence and atrocity, we will run through the art historical ‘narrative’. In what ways has violence been represented, from antiquity until the 20th century, for example in religious, mythological or historical artworks? What differences occurred in the use of different artistic mediums? We will analyse artistic examples from different periods in order to link history with art. Within the context of contemporary sociopolitical events, we will discuss to what extend our familiarity with images of violence can help us approach artworks from the past from a different perspective.

  • March 29th :

Kyveli Lignou-Tsamantani: «‘Histories’ of violence and atrocity in art: An overview». Part 2.

By taking as point of departure the notions of violence and atrocity, we will run through the art historical ‘narrative’. In what ways has violence been represented, from antiquity until the 20th century, for example in religious, mythological or historical artworks? What differences occurred in the use of different artistic mediums? We will analyse artistic examples from different periods in order to link history with art. Within the context of contemporary sociopolitical events, we will discuss to what extend our familiarity with images of violence can help us approach artworks from the past from a different perspective.

  • April 12th:

Delia Tzortzaki: Collections of curiosities (cabinets de curiosites) in modern Europe

Even though collecting can be traced back to the Upper Paleolithic, it has hardly acquired stronger a meaning than in Medici Florence. During the centuries that followed, in Italy and elsewhere, scientists and the aristocracy formed collections of rarities including both priceless and humble objects. The collectors justified their choice by having recourse on mystical texts presenting the objects’ magical powers and suggesting ideal combinations. For centuries, researchers considered the collections of curiosities to simply be chaotic compilations of objects picked up at random. However, recent studies show that the collections constituted a dynamic mirroring of the macrocosm which could affect earthly doings. By drawing on collection studies, writers such as Umberto Eco as well as on the work of contemporary artists inspired by the cabinets de curiosites, we will discuss this phenomenon and its trajectory from the prime, rather metaphysical groupings of objects to more familiar systems of object organizing and classification.

  • Mai 10th :

Delia Tzortzaki: The reticent – the talking object

There is often the case of throwing away our kids’ toys while being rarely interested in more than their form, if anything. The brand name of the production company imprinted with tiny characters on the back or the feet of a doll; the name of the country of origin; a kind of material not in use anymore; the objects, as humble as they can be, offer an enormous amount of information about the time they were made and the people using them. By applying the methodology of object analysis, we put under the microscope decorative objects and objects of use and observe how we can extract and classify the information given. Within material culture studies, object analysis leads the path to curating processes, which means the way we decide to mount and present our material. During the second half of our meeting, we go mentally back to our space and observe our relationship with the objects at home. Do we have objects in our possession that we never decide to get rid of? Are we consciously collecting objects? Where in the house are we placing them? What would we write about them if we were to make a written account, like for example, an archive card?

  • Mai 24th:

Everyday histories of art” (Coordination: Elpida Rikou)

Projects’ presentation by the workshop participants and discussion.

(2nd trimester: March-April-Mai)

ENTERart 2.b/ “About love”.

Elpida Rikou,

In collaboration with

Description

If experiences, ideas, images, sensations of love are constructed through narratives, texts, songs, movies, if we learn and experience love through everyday performances, the role of culture and particularly of art may be of central importance in this construction. Let’s ask ourselves, then, “how do we fall in love?”

Collective project suggested: A research archive based on lived experiences which serve to the participants in order to elaborate new tales about love with the use of different media (video, photography, performance, writing, etc.).

Tuesday 18:30-20:30

Dates: March 8th , March 22nd , April 5th, April 19th , Mai 17th, Mai 31st

Program:

  • March 8th :

Elpida Rikou. “The emotion of love (eros) as an ‘artistic’ social construction?”

Emotions tend to be understood as “inward” expressions of the “self”. We will critically confront this widely spread conception of emotions and feelings, with the help of anthropological and psychosociological theories based on social constructionism. We shall focus on “love” (eros) as a complex of experiences, attitudes, ideas, images, sensations, constructed thought narratives, texts, songs, movies, learned and lived through everyday performances… The role of culture and of art, more specifically, seems central to this construction. But is this

  • March 22nd :

Alexandra Siotou: Politics of love

How do we fall in love? Who is recognized as worthy of being loved? Are we overwhelmed by public discources about love? How is the political sense of belonging connected with the warmth of erotic belonging? We examine love letters and poems, everyday practices of love such as the “romantic dinner for two” or “homemade” treats, but also technologically mediated love experiences (sms, dating sites) bringing to the fore love’s sociocultural dimension as well as the network connecting this “personal” emotion par excellence with the political, economic and social hierarchies.

  • April 5th :

Medie Mega: Choreographies of love

What constitutes today’s ‘choreography of love’ and who is its choreographer? How is our embodied experience of love shaped by the contexts and spaces within which we meet, interact and make love? Dance, an art form which is traditionally connected to youth, the active and healthy body, to sensuality and physical pleasure in a variety of ways, could be a rich resource in the study of love or ‘eros’ as a complex psychosocial phenomenon.

During our meeting we will apply a choreographic gaze to everyday practices of love and we will examine some examples from the history of stage dance, through our own embodied knowledge of love, that is, as subjects that have been in love. If the atmosphere gets really hot, we might even cast doubt on the very basis of the conversation, the incumbent connection between dance and the erotic.

  • April 19th:

Elpida Rikou: Images of love in art and everyday life

Πώς απεικονίζεται διαχρονικά η ερωτική σχέση στις εικαστικές τέχνες των δυτικών και μη δυτικών κοινωνιών; Την προσεγγίζουν και με ποιο τρόπο οι σύγχρονοι καλλιτέχνες; Ποια ζητούμενα κοινωνικά, πολιτικά, πολιτισμικά αναδεικνύονται μέσω της αναφοράς στον έρωτα μέσω της τέχνης; Εντέλει, πώς συνδέονται οι «εικόνες» αυτές με τις παραστάσεις του έρωτα που προτείνονται μέσω άλλων τεχνών (πχ. του κινηματογράφου, της μουσικής κλπ.) και της ποπ κουλτούρας, κυκλοφορούν στα ΜΜΕ και στοιχειοθετούνται στις καθημερινές συμπεριφορές μας; Τα ερωτήματα αυτά θα τα πραγματευτούμε μέσω επιλογής ορισμένων παραδειγμάτων που θα καθοδηγήσουν τη συζήτηση με τους συμμετέχοντες.

  • Mai 17th :

Readings with background music (Coordination: Elpida Rikou)

The participants present texts and songs they consider important for their own experiences of love.

  • Mai 31st:

Love in question” (Coordination: Elpida Rikou)

The main issues approached in the workshop, the research archive and the projects elaborated by the participants on love are presented and discussed.

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